Aboriginal tribes of India - Wild Voyager Blog
Wildvoyager
Aboriginal tribes of India

Aboriginal tribes of India

A trip to India typically consists of experiencing various cultures, traditions, and religions. While there is no doubt that India is a vibrant and diverse country, one cannot forget the native or indigenous people who have protected the land for hundreds of years.

As per the 2011 census, India is home to 700 distinct aboriginal tribes, comprising at least 15% of the Indian population. The tribes live far from the contemporary trends and have maintained their personal identity for years. Referred to as “Adivasis”, each tribe has its own language, festival, heritage, cuisine, music, and dance.

Tribal women in Araku Valley, Andhra Pradesh
Tribal women in Araku Valley, Andhra Pradesh

During your travel in the country, you can come across different Indian tribes no matter the region. From the Himalayas to Andamans and even Rajasthan, the aboriginal tribes are found all over India. However, the majority of the tribes reside in Central India.

The Indian tribes are especially popular for their handicraft industry. Each tribe has a creative art and style of  various hand-made goods which reflect their culture. On the other hand, tribes celebrate their festivals that are colorful and exciting to observe.

To gain more insight, here are 8 diverse aboriginal tribes of India:

Gond tribe

The Gond, Gondi, or Koitur are spotted in several states including Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Maharashtra, Odisha, and Andhra Pradesh. The Gond tribe is one of the largest Adivasi groups in India. This tribe is largely influenced by Hinduism. Some of the festivals they celebrate are Pola and Phag.

A colorful Gond art painted by a tribal woman
A colorful Gond art painted by a tribal woman

Linguistically, the Gondi language is related to Telugu but they also speak regional languages like Marathi, Odia, and Hindi. If you steer inside a Gondi forest, you can experience the tribe’s ritualistic performances, observe traditional villages and their cuisine.

Santal tribe

The Santal or Santhal tribe belongs to the Munda ethnic group. In terms of population, they are largely found in Jharkhand along with Assam, Bihar, and West Bengal. The tribe speaks the widely spoken Munda languages, Santali.

The Santal tribe of Jharkhand
The Santal tribe of Jharkhand

Sohrai is the main festival of the Santal tribe which celebrates the harvest. A feast is organized to honor and express gratitude to the livestock. During the festival, an indigenous Sohra art form is practiced. This art is intricate and is usually done in the traditional Santal homes. The Santhal dance and music are some of the major attractions that cannot be missed.

Garo tribe

Garo indigenous tribe is one of the few matrilineal societies left in the world. They are a Tibeto-Burman ethnic group notably found in Assam, Meghalaya, Tripura, and Nagaland along with a few neighboring parts of West Bengal and Bangladesh.

Young Garo women dressed in traditional attire
Young Garo women dressed in traditional attire

The modern Garo tribe is significantly influenced by Christianity. They are easily distinguished from other Meghalaya tribes such as Khasi and Jaintia. The men and women of the Garo tribe are always adorned with beautiful ornaments such as jaksan (bangles), ripok (necklace), Pilne (head ornament worn by women), and turban. They also carry along a principal weapon called mil am which is a two-edged sword.

The Wangal festival is one of the biggest celebrations of the Garo tribe which is the thanksgiving after the harvest. Moreover, the tribe is also prominent for its Garo architecture such as Nokmong, Jamsireng, Jamadaal, and Nokpante.

Jarawa tribe

The Jarawa tribe resides in the stunning Andaman and Nicobar Island. They are one of the oldest tribes of India as they had inhabited the islands almost 60,000 years ago. With a scanty population of just 200-400, the Jarawa are usually dispersed along the western coast of the south and middle Andaman Island. They are part of the Great Andamanese Tribe which also includes the Onge, Jangil, and the Sentinelese.

A young Jarawa boy
A young Jarawa boy

Jarawas are traditionally hunter-forager- fishermen as well as warriors who protected their territory. However, the contact with the outside world led to a decrease in their numbers, as Jarawas were at risk of several diseases. Today, they are largely dependent on campaigns led by Survival and Indian organizations.

Bhil tribe

Amidst the royal palaces and forts of Rajasthan, the Bhil tribe is an important community in the state. This aboriginal tribe is an Indo-Aryan-speaking ethnic group. They are mostly spotted in the Aravalli ranges in Udaipur and the Bhasawar district. Besides Rajasthan, they are found in Maharashtra, Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh, and Chhattisgarh.

Bhil women perform the ghoomar dance
Bhil women perform the ghoomar dance

The Bhil tribe is extremely popular for its rich culture. The notable Ghoomar dance is a traditional folk dance of the tribe that symbolizes womanhood. The major festivals of Bhils are the Bhagorai mela and the Gavari festival which attract a lot of tourists.

Angami tribe

The Angamis belong to the Naga ethnic group and are notable for their majestic Hornbill festival. The Angami Nagas are settled in the Dimapur and Kohima districts of Nagaland and are divided into four regions.

Angami tribe display a ritualistic performance
Angami tribe display a ritualistic performance

The Agamis Nagas are hill people which depend on livestock rearing and cultivation. They are also known for terraced wet-rice cultivation made on hill slopes. Furthermore, the artwork and handicrafts built by the Angamis are immensely popular.

While the tribe’s festival is well-known around the country, the traditional attire worn by the Agamis is uniquely designed to signify prosperity and success.

Irula tribe

Irula also called Iruliga is a Dravidian ethnic group settled in the South Indian states of Karnataka, Kerala, and Tamil Nadu. This tribe is especially known for being an expert in rat and snake hunting skills. The Irulas are the second largest tribe in Kerala and are mostly seen in the Palakkad district.

Irula people working in a field
Irula people working in a field

The indigenous Irula people are specialists in age-old herbal medicines and healing practices. They are primarily engaged in agricultural labor. The Irula are famous for their ritualistic practices and produce their own wooden instruments. They also observe the Mattu Pongal festival and pay special homage to cows.

Munda tribe

The Munda tribe belongs to the Austroasiatic (a large language family of Mainland southeast Asia) speaking Indian ethnic group. They are found in the northern areas of the country, particularly in the states of Odisha, Jharkhand, and West Bengal. Munda tribe is one of the largest scheduled tribes (ST) in India.

An old Munda house
An old Munda house

In the Indian tribal belt, the Munda tribes are nomadic hunters who are today employed in various government organizations. Munda people celebrate seasonal festivals such as Phagu, Mage Praba, Karam, and Sarhul. They participate in social events and perform traditional folk dances such as the Nupur dance, narrate tales, and dedicate songs to their supreme deity, Sing Bonga.

The indigenous people in India are extremely crucial as they help protect our environment. Unfortunately, their rights aren’t safeguarded and, in many cases, their land is taken away to make way for industries. Presently, there is a need to secure the rights of these tribes in order to keep their population and culture alive.

 

If you loved reading this story, then subscribe to our blog here (it will ask to verify your email) to get inspiring travel stories and trivia delivered to your email. Stories about wildlife trivia, cultural experiences, curated luxury hotel lists, underrated places to travel, polar journeys and much more. 

 

 


Wild Voyager Team

The blogging team at Wild Voyager. We are explorers at heart and we love to share our travel stories and destination knowledge with you, which often serve as an inspiration for the life changing journeys we curate. When you decide to embark on one such life changing journey, our travel experience designers at letstalk@wildvoyager.com will be happy to get you started.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *







Similar Posts

CALL US ENQUIRE
error: Content is protected !!