Where to see wild dogs in Africa - Wild Voyager Blog
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Where to see wild dogs in Africa

Where to see wild dogs in Africa

The African wild dog, also going by the nickname ‘Lycaon pictus’ or ‘painted dog’, is extremely rare to see during a safari. Once found throughout Africa, these wild mammal species are now endangered according to the IUCN status. It is estimated that about 6,600 adult wild dogs remain around the world today.

This threatened species has a fluctuating population due to various causes. These include vulnerability to diseases such as rabies, competition with other predators like lions, displacement by rival packs, and cooperative killing. This is why spotting wild dogs in their natural habitat accounts for a special occurrence.

An adult African wild dog
An adult African wild dog

A wild dog has distinct colorations and regular patterns of black, white, and reddish-brown tan. This makes them easily distinguishable from other animals and thus, appears as painted wolves. Another striking feature of wild dogs is their large, round ears, often referred to as ‘Mickey Mouse’ ears.

Wild dogs are one of the most successful predators that have keen intelligence, excellent hearing and vision, fine co-operative skills, and exceptional speed. They are always found in packs consisting of 2 to 27 adult dogs and their pups. The wild dog pack works together to raise a litter of pups, confirming their strong bond.

Wild dogs are found in Southern Africa, or the Eastern coast of Africa. Since their territory sizes are vast, it is important to choose the right safari destination. Here are some of the places you can spot the rare and elusive wild dog in Africa:

Botswana

Okavango Delta -Moremi Game Reserve

The vast and open Northern Botswana is filled with luscious landscapes and diverse species. The Okavango Delta is the world’s biggest inland delta. As the delta is known to act as a magnet for a variety of wildlife, wild dogs are also spotted here. Okavango Delta provides a sanctuary for a number of wild dog packs. Wild dogs living in the delta are found in drier camps rather than those areas surrounded by water.  

The Okavango Delta
The Okavango Delta

Moremi Game Reserve is part of the central Okavango Delta. As it offers year-round water resources, the reserve manages to attract animals from far and wide. Moremi Game Reserve is considered to be the best place to spot wild dogs in Botswana as it houses 150 to 200 of their population.

In the eastern sections of the game reserve lies two strategically placed lodges where one can catch sight of the wild dogs. The Xakanaxa Camp is located on the Khwai River and overlooks the Xakanaxa lagoon. The Khwai Lodge set near the North Gate of Moremi Game Reserve also offers good sightings of the wild dogs.

Linyanti

In Northern Botswana lies the Linyanti, an area nestled between the borders of Namibia, Savuti, and the Selinda channel. The Linyanti swamp features a landscape of open floodplains and scattered woodlands, making it one of the most productive regions to spot various wildlife species. It is home to several roaming wild dog packs as well.

Wild dogs in the wilderness
Wild dogs in the wilderness

The Linyanti Bush Camp is the perfect base to stay and increase your chances of witnessing wild dogs in their natural habitat.

South Africa

Madikwe Game Reserve

Madikwe Game Reserve may be small in stature but has successfully captured sightings of the wild dog species. The reserve underwent a massive change in the 1990s where diverse wildlife was introduced after experiencing a failed and unproductive farmland. Owning to its success story of rehabilitation and conservation, there is a healthy population of wild dogs found in the Madikwe Reserve.

The scenic Madikwe Game Reserve
The scenic Madikwe Game Reserve

This malaria-free reserve is famous for its small yet feisty wild dog predators. They are almost regularly seen along with the Big Five animals. The Tuningi Safari Lodge is a good accommodation option in Madikwe Game Reserve where professional guides strive hard to track down wild dogs among other animals such as leopards and lions.

Kruger National Park

Kruger National Park in South Africa is the most popular and largest game reserves in the country. This renowned wildlife area has a remarkable diversity of animals, plants, and bird species. It covers an area of 7, 576 sq. mi where the population of wild dogs is widespread in the region. The Greater Kruger area which not only includes the Kruger National Park but also certain private reserves like Timbavati, Manyeleti, Sabi Sands, and MalaMala has packs of wild dogs residing.

Wild dogs play around with each other
Wild dogs play around with each other

The best place to stay is at any of the Sabi Sands lodges as it is a collection of private safari lodges and offers an intimate experience. Guests can enjoy off-roading for special sightings which are usually reserved for wild dogs and other predators.

Hluhluwe Imfolozi National Park

Hluhluwe Imfolozi National Park is one of the lesser-known national parks, located in beautiful Kwa Zulu Natal. It is the oldest proclaimed protected national park in South Africa, dating back to approximately 1895. Hluhluwe Imfolozi National Park is a Big Five reserve but is also home to a substantial population of wild dogs. It has reintroduced wild dogs and monitor them on a daily basis. Over the years, their numbers have grown as multiple packs have been seen in Hluhluwe Imfolozi.

A wild dog pup
A wild dog pup

The Hilltop camp located in Hluhluwe Imfolozi Game Reserve offers guided game drives and other safari options where witnessing wild dogs have become a real possibility.

Tanzania

Selous

Selous National Park is sprawled over 45,000 kilometers and is three times bigger than the bustling Serengeti. Home to around 100,000 impalas, predators in Selous are in abundance. Owing to this reason, approximately 800 wild dogs roam the wide and beautiful reserve as well as its stunning forest areas. Although Selous is 50,000 square kilometers in size, it is a less busy place than any other park in Tanzania, making sightings even more genuine. Due to its vast capacity, wild dogs have plenty of space to move around as well.

Selous Game Reserve
Selous Game Reserve

The Sand Rivers Selous overlooks the Rufiji River where the wild dogs’ dens are seen towards the east of the camp. The Selous Serena Camp is also one of the ideal bases to explore the remoteness of Selous along with spotting wild dogs.

Ruaha National Park

Located in central Tanzania, Ruaha National Park is the largest national park in the country. The Great Ruaha River is known to be a lifeline for the wildlife living in the park. Although rich in flora and fauna as well as huge in size, Ruaha is the least visited park in Tanzania. Hence, safaris here are more exclusive and remote.

Wild dogs resting
Wild dogs resting

A good population of wild dogs resides in Ruaha but it is difficult to spot them as there are only a few camps set in the park. Moreover, dense woodland and 50,000 kilometers of Baobab dotted savannah makes it impossible to catch their sightings. To increase your chances and luck to see wild dogs, the Mwagusi Safari Camp located in Ruaha National Park is a preferred accommodation option as visitors are known to have multiple sightings of them.

Zimbabwe

Mana Pools

David Attenborough’s ‘Dynasties’, a BBC series, featured Mana Pools in its Wild Dogs episode. Since then, Mana Pools National Park became increasingly famous. Every year, wild dog dens situated in and around the national park provide exciting sightings to visitors. There are two main areas in the park where wild dogs are often seen.

Wild dogs enjoying their meal
Wild dogs enjoying their meal

There are wild dog dens close to the banks of the Zambezi River that travel through the northern boundary of the park. Additionally, the more remote area, Chitake Springs, forces wildlife to congregate during the dry winter months which also attracts predators like lion pride and wild dogs waiting to hunt.

The best place to stay in Ruaha is the Vundu Camp where the BBC team stayed during the filming of the series.

Hwange National Park

Hwange is one of the largest national parks in Zimbabwe, known to be roughly the size of Belgium. The national park is home to twice the number of wild dogs than in Mana Pools; around 200 of these dogs in over 30 packs. The park also has the longest-running conservative initiative known as the Painted Dog Conservation project that protects, rehabilitates, and reintroduces these animal species in the country.

The spacious Hwange National Park
The spacious Hwange National Park

The Hide, a luxury safari camp in Hwange, has viewing hides, located on the edge of waterholes and provides excellent opportunities to observe wildlife.

Zambia

South Luangwa National Park

South Luangwa National Park encompasses the beautiful Luangwa Valley which is exceptionally rich in diverse wildlife. It is mostly due to the flowing Luangwa River that the game concentrations in the park are among the highest. The area is also well-known for predator sightings namely lion, spotted hyena leopard, and the elusive Wild Dog. The Zambian Carnivore Programme has boosted the population of wild dogs which are now estimated to be around 300 in the Luangwa Valley.

South Luangwa National Park
South Luangwa National Park

A stay at the rustic Nsolo Bush Camp or Flatdog camps not only offers exhilarating sights of the wild dog packs but other animals residing in Luangwa as well.

Kenya

Laikipia

Laikipia lies at the end of the eastern escarpment of the Great Rift Valley and is noted for community-run conservancies. The semi-arid wilderness of Laikipia is known to be the only region where wild dog sightings occur regularly. In 2017, around 10 packs were decimated by canine temper but they slowly started emerging in the Loisaba Conservancy in the following years.

An African wild dog awaits its prey
An African wild dog awaits its prey

Staying at Laikipia Wilderness Camp promises adventurous wild dog sightings, as well as a look at the conservation programmes run in Laikipia

When to see wild dogs in Africa

The prime time to see wild dogs in Africa is generally during the dry winter months of May to July as they establish their dens during this period. At some parks, they are often seen from September to October as well.

To witness wild dogs in their natural habitat, all the places mentioned above are worth a visit. Learning and spreading more awareness about this endangered species can help support their conservation better.

 

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Wild Voyager Team

The blogging team at Wild Voyager. We are explorers at heart and we love to share our travel stories and destination knowledge with you, which often serve as an inspiration for the life changing journeys we curate. When you decide to embark on one such life changing journey, our travel experience designers at letstalk@wildvoyager.com will be happy to get you started.

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